Wooden Cutting Board Types

Here at Words with Boards, we offer plenty of different options of wood in our Cutting Boards. Our cutting boards (and tons of other products!) come in maple, cherry, and walnut woods.

Are you unsure of which wood type is perfect for you?Read along to hear all about our different woods, why we love them so much, and even why we avoid using other types of wood!


Maple Cutting Board

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🍁 Maple wood's light, modern color goes with any decor.

🍁 Maple hardwood is durable due to its dense wood grain, which makes for a great cutting surface.

🍁 We find a Maple Cutting Boards doesn't dry out as fast as the other woods, which make caring for it a little easier.

🍁 The maple wood we use to make cutting boards come from sustainable forests and for every product sold, a tree is planted in North America. Read more One Tree Planted.

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Cherry Cutting Board

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πŸ’ Your knives won't become dull from cutting on a Cherry Cutting Board. Cherry wood is the perfect balance between hard enough as a cutting surface but soft enough to be knife friendly.

πŸ’ Laser engraving looks best on cherry wood as seen on our cherry Leopard Print Serving Board.

πŸ’ If you already have a lot of cherry wood in your home, a cherry cutting board will fit right in.

πŸ’When you buy a cherry cutting board, we give to an organization that plants a tree in North America.

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Walnut Cutting Board

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πŸ”ͺ Walnut wood will keep your knives sharp- no one likes a dull knife!

πŸ”ͺ Our Walnut Cutting Boards are butcher block to prevent warping.

πŸ”ͺ If you're worried about food stains on your cutting board, then the dark color walnut offers may be a better choice for you.

πŸ”ͺ Walnut isn't as hard as maple, but don't worry- it's perfectly fine to use as a cutting board.

πŸ”ͺ If you're looking for oohs and aahs, look no further than walnut wood. It will not disappoint!

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Bamboo Cutting Board

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A Bamboo Cutting Board is a sustainable product. Since utilizing sustainable wood is a criteria for Words with Boards, it would make sense for us to offer bamboo wood, however we do not. This is not to say you shouldn't have a bamboo cutting board in the kitchen, it just shouldn't be one you cut on regularly.

The reasons are simple: we don't like cutting on bamboo! The feel and sound of a knife when it hits the hard bamboo surface doesn't feel right. In fact, bamboo is about 15% harder than maple wood. It also has different hardnesses across the board and is typically a thinner board.

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Where our products are featured
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